Can gum disease cause arthritis? Physicians have been interested in the possible connection between gum disease and arthritis since as early as 1980. In one of the newest studies on periodontitis and swollen joints, physicians studied over 6,100 men between 1987 and 1998 to assess the prevalence of each condition. One shocking discovery: Of the men studied, those with severe gum disease were twice as likely to suffer with sever symptoms of Rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Difficult things are often the most rewarding. And when it comes to oral health, this concept is particularly true. Flossing is one of the most difficult habits to adopt—most children and adults recoil at the idea of having their teeth flossed during a dental cleaning, much less every night. Yet flossing is one of the most important oral hygiene habits to develop.

This Valentine’s Day, the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP) encourages men and women of all ages to love the gums you’re with. This health initiative spreads awareness for the holistic connection between the mouth and body—emphasizing the ways gum disease may significantly increase your risk of developing other serious illnesses. Visit this article to learn more about the AAP, gum disease, and ways to prevent serious illness.

Does gum disease cause heart disease? According to the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP), there is strong evidence in support of the answer yes. And with 47% of American adults suffering with periodontal (gum) disease, the number of individuals at high risk for cardiovascular issues like heart attack and stroke is staggering.

In this article, we explore how insulin-related diseases can cause a rise in blood sugar levels that ultimately harms the holistic health of the body. We then examine how these conditions accelerate the development of gingivitis, periodontal disease, tooth decay, and undermine oral surgeries, like dental implants.

Have you been ignoring the agitation caused by inflammation and infection along your gum line? Read this article to learn more about these symptoms, what they mean, how they affect the health of the entire body, and how they can be effectively treated to eliminate both infection and pain.

There are plenty of reasons to desire a straighter, whiter smile. Your smile is often the focal point of your appearance, and it is usually the first thing another friend, colleague, or classmate will notice. Moreover, several studies indicate that an eye-catching smile makes people of all ages appear happier, healthier, and more successful.

As the holiday season begins, we can’t help but get excited with the joy and laughter that seems just around the corner. Family, friends, and good home cooked meals are just a few of the best things about the holidays. This time of year, it’s always nice to take a moment to reflect on all the good things in our lives, while also taking time to recommit ourselves to healthier lifestyle choices.

Don’t wait until New Year’s Eve to start thinking of ways to stay healthy! From Thanksgiving through the end of December, there are plenty of opportunities to improve the health of your teeth, gums, and total body. As the gateway to the entire body, the mouth plays a vital role in holistic health. Take a moment to review this list of tips for cavity prevention during the holidays, and experience health benefits that extend far beyond the teeth and gums.

Oil pulling is an all-natural way to improve oral health. Although oil pulling is just now enjoying positive feedback from dental patients, it is actually an age old practice that originated in India thousands of years ago. It wasn’t until the 1990s that health experts in the Western world began recommending oil pulling as a way to naturally detoxify the body, particularly the teeth and gums. Today, many holistic dentists recognize oil pulling as a safe, easy, and inexpensive way to significantly reduce the risk of tooth decay, oral infection, and gum disease.

miami-dentist-debridement-definitionDo you visit the dentist for a teeth cleaning every 6 months? Chances are good that you do not. Many adults take up to 12 months or more to visit the dentist for an exam or cleaning. Significant amounts of plaque tend to accumulate along the gum line, even though you may be brushing and flossing regularly. Extended absences from the dentist only increase the accumulation of plaque and bacteria in the mouth. Eventually, a process called debridement may be necessary to remove hard-to-reach plaque and restore general oral health.

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