Nearly a half million Americans die of a smoking-related illness each year. Since the mid 1900s, an overwhelming body of research has demonstrated how smoking causes devastating harm to the mouth, lungs, heart, and other vital organ systems. Few habits are known to cause more harm to the body, yet an estimated 16 million Americans…

There is a well-documented link between smiling, happiness, and overall quality of life. In one study, researchers found that healthy adults who reported high levels of life satisfaction also happened to be smiling in high school yearbook photos. Other studies show similar correlations between gum health, happiness, and life satisfaction. Read more to learn simple ways to improve health, strengthen teeth, and build happiness!

Can gum disease cause arthritis? Physicians have been interested in the possible connection between gum disease and arthritis since as early as 1980. In one of the newest studies on periodontitis and swollen joints, physicians studied over 6,100 men between 1987 and 1998 to assess the prevalence of each condition. One shocking discovery: Of the men studied, those with severe gum disease were twice as likely to suffer with sever symptoms of Rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Difficult things are often the most rewarding. And when it comes to oral health, this concept is particularly true. Flossing is one of the most difficult habits to adopt—most children and adults recoil at the idea of having their teeth flossed during a dental cleaning, much less every night. Yet flossing is one of the most important oral hygiene habits to develop.

This Valentine’s Day, the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP) encourages men and women of all ages to love the gums you’re with. This health initiative spreads awareness for the holistic connection between the mouth and body—emphasizing the ways gum disease may significantly increase your risk of developing other serious illnesses. Visit this article to learn more about the AAP, gum disease, and ways to prevent serious illness.

Holistic dentistry studies the connections between the mouth and the rest of the body. In past articles, we’ve explored how gum disease can increase the risk of heart disease. This mouth-body connection is just one of many examples that show how each piece of the human body is connected to the next. Below are two new studies that indicate another connection, one that may surprise most readers.

According to the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP), men and women who suffer with diabetes are at a higher risk for developing periodontal disease (gum disease). For medical professionals, the new link is just another piece of evidence illustrating the complex and interconnected nature of the human body. But for adults who suffer with type I or II diabetes, the research is a clear warning to stay vigilant in the fight against oral infection and tooth decay.

Does gum disease cause heart disease? According to the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP), there is strong evidence in support of the answer yes. And with 47% of American adults suffering with periodontal (gum) disease, the number of individuals at high risk for cardiovascular issues like heart attack and stroke is staggering.

From a holistic perspective, gum disease has also been linked with heart disease and diabetes. Now, a recent study has made a new link between gum disease and prostate inflammation.

Some dentists believe root canals are necessary for remedying severe damage to the tooth and its root, whether occurring from cavities, fractures, or abscesses. When the root becomes inflamed, removal of the infection is necessary. Without treatment of some sort, individuals might experience pain, swelling, or discomfort in the afflicted area. These symptoms should be discussed as soon as possible with your dental professional so they can provide adequate treatment.

2018 © Copyright Assure A Smile. All Rights Reserved.

For all cases        1-305-274-0047